A Short Walk at Reimers Ranch


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This is a 4 picture vertical Panorama taken with the 18-400 lens

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This is the same single picture taken with the 18-400 lens

During our long and very hot summer,  walking, at least for me, was out of the question so I kind of hid away inside my house in the very comfortable air conditioning. I only braved the outdoors either early in the mornings or if there was a pond emergency, and as quickly as possible. I am definitely turning into a wimp as the heat never used to bother me. Now that the temperatures are much more bearable and no longer reaching even 90 degrees, I am spending more time outdoors, sort of.

The three months of 100 degree heat has brought about a change in me due to the enforced stay inside. I seem to lack the energy and ambition to get out in the yard or hit the trails again now that it is cooler. It’s all  in my mind as I do fine when I actually get after it. So a couple of days ago, I said to hell with it and  grabbed my camera and drove to Reimers Ranch to get some pictures and go on a short walk. I had no intentions of it being anything more than just a stroll to get myself back into the swing of things. I didn’t even put on my boots or any of the usual camera paraphernalia that I normally carry. Heck, I didn’t even take my walking poles, just me and my camera. I did have the new  18-400 lens on the camera as this would be the first real work out for this setup.

I parked in the River Bend Parking Area being the only car in the lot as it was a weekday. This lot has a concrete road that leads down to the Beach and Swimming areas although it can only be used to transport items, canoes and such, as it is just for drop off and unloading. There is no parking allowed in the Beach areas.

My interest was in the opposite direction as I walked down the concrete road and then took the River Trail. The plan was to walk as far as the next parking area, Riverview Parking No 1 and then depending on how things were going, either climb up and out at that Lot and back along the gravel walk that covers the entire length of the river within the park, or back track the way I had come along River Trail.

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I decided to backtrack rather than risk the climb back out of the gorge without my poles. There were a lot of Buzzards perched in the trees with a few circling around in the air. They must have had a good feed from something with so many of them perched as they were. I watched one of  them go through a series of wing stretches and then sit with its wings spread out as though to either dry them or catch some rays. The water level in the river was very low as our recent rains have not done enough to replenish it. I guess that with the ground so dry, most of the rain soaked in and did not run off. The foliage has not yet changed very much except that the green is now a rather drab looking color.

When I got back to the concrete road, I walked it to the Beach area. I took a few pictures and decided that I had seen enough. There were no other people around so I guess the swimming season is over. My last exertions for the day was the steep climb back up the concrete road.

Reimers Ranch 10-02-2018 from Francis Allcorn on Vimeo.

I ended up walking a little over two miles which was enough for me to restart my hiking again now that the weather is so much cooler. On the way back, I stopped at Golds Gym, the one that I joined before I hurt my shoulder 8 weeks ago, to get them to show me around. The equipment is very new and much more modern than the old gym I used to belong to. They even have saunas and hot tubs. Now that my therapy sessions are almost over, I can start to exercise more at least on the treadmills as that does not require any heavy lifting. I can’t wait…

Written 10/04/2018

First Walk of the Year


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As the weather has warmed up a bit and needing to clear my head out in the fresh Texas air, I decided to go for a short walk at Reimer’s Ranch, a place I have hiked many times before.

I don’t know if it is a mandatory question or not but the guy at the gate asked me if I was over sixty two as Seniors get to walk the Travis County Parks for free. That made me feel good about myself and even better when I proudly declared to be eighty two as he waved me through with a big smile.

I opted to park in the  Lot that ramps down to the beach area which is the second lot as you drive in and headed down onto the lower trail. I chose to walk alongside the Pedernales River which doesn’t have a lot of water in it at this time of the year. It won’t be too long before the Spring rains will have it flowing at a goodly pace. Even so, I didn’t see any river activity and as I was in no particular hurry, took several shots of the trail and the surrounding rocks. I ran into a guy and we chatted for a bit. He dragged out his cell phone to show me a picture, of which he was particularly proud of a giant Centipede or maybe it was a Millipede as I don’t know the difference. Anyway it was big and was at least six inches long. We moved on and there was nothing major that caught my eye but I was still glad to be out and about. Needless to say, I didn’t see the Osprey or even any Buzzards. No idea where the Buzzards were hiding as usually there are bunches of them swooping and gliding in the sky above.

One thing is very obvious from the pictures is that the Park definitely has on it’s winter coat. Almost everything was brown and the only occasional green spot was  from one of the deciduous trees. or an occasional shrub. I only walked about a mile before turning around to make tracks back to my car. It felt good to be walking again and I promised myself that I need to get out again and soon.

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The pictures above are all Panoramic made up of several different camera shots

Written 2/6/2018

 

Reamers Ranch 10-29-2017


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I went for another walk at Reamers Ranch this time to get in a good walk and to take a few pictures along the way. I still have hopes of seeing the Osprey again but am no longer just concentrating on it’s location although to be truthful, my walking plan did include the area I had seen the Osprey before. I planned to walk along the Multi Use Trail towards the North end of the Park and to go all the way along Confluence Trail until the trail ends at the boundary of the Park Property. I have walked this several times previously and always have the hope that I might see deer or a turkey as I have before although much too slow with the camera to get the pictures. Along the way, I found some flowers that were absolutely covered with bees and butterflies.

I tried something new by only using one walking stick so that I could carry the camera in the other hand, just in case. Even though I was ready this time, the animals and birds obviously did not get the message as none appeared to have their picture taken on the first part of the walk to the end of the trail.

I cut back through the lower trail which the Parks people have spent some time on and now it is much better walking as you can see from the pictures above and followed right alongside of the Pedernales River with a good view of the water and the opposite bank which is all private property. Some of it is well maintained as the Panorama below shows. I kept my eyes open in the hopes of catching a view of the Osprey but all I saw were buzzards.
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I continued along until I came to the area popular with the rock climbers and took some pictures of them on the wall. Better them than me as it is not my idea of fun.

I carried on walking along the Lower Trail until I reached the exit to get back to the third parking lot. This too is a difficult climb to get out. I met a young lady who was coming down and we chatted for a bit about the trails.

When I got to the top, I headed north along the gravel walkway towards the last parking lot known as North Bank. Along the way, I met a young gentleman and we exchanged pleasantries as we crossed paths. I noticed three buzzards in the tree in front of me and at first, couldn’t make out what they were up to. Then I figured that they were a female and two males and were going through a mating ritual of a sort I guess for the female to make a choice. I managed to quickly change settings to video and got this very short one. I would have thought that it was too late in the season for mating but maybe these are younger birds finding their first mate. I stood and watched them for a bit until they flew off. You never know what interesting picture is around the next bend.

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I arrived back to my car tired and happy and changed into some dry clothes and sat for a while eating an apple.  It is so quiet and peaceful there and it is very easy to slip into a state of reverie and just letting the world pass on by. Altogether, I covered 6.5 miles, not bad for a day’s stroll in the park with the added bonus of a lot of pictures.

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Written 11-10-2017

Looking and Hoping. Cheerful pictures for a winters day…


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After my recent encounter at least from the viewing perspective of the Osprey, I made another trip to Reimers Ranch in the hope of spotting it once more. I wanted more pictures and hopefully this time, a video that in my excitement the last time out and not wanting to miss a single moment of the display the beautiful bird was putting on for me, did not try to change my camera’s settings.

I was all prepared this time and even brought a tripod with me ready to go but someone, somewhere forgot to tell the Osprey about our appointment. Consequently, no Osprey shots as it wasn’t there at least at the same time as I was.

I wasn’t about to waste the opportunity for another camera shoot or a hike. I had parked in the next to last parking lot, known as River View Parking Lot that had access to one of the climbing areas and there was only one other vehicle in the lot besides mine. As per my usual routine, I slipped into my gear, grabbed my water bottle and walking poles and set off on the gravel trail that follows the Pedernales River from the very top of the gorge towards parking lot number three known as River bend Parking Lot.  The gravel trail does not necessarily keep close to the river bank and in some places the trail is probably up to several hundred yards inland.  There are a couple of spots where it is close enough to actually see the water and I spent some time taking pictures of the far bank with its cliffs all in the hope of spotting the Osprey.

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When I reached the third parking lot back towards the park entrance, I made my way down towards the river. Both this entrance and the one by the fourth parking lot are difficult climb downs even though they do have semblance of steps. I took pictures of the climb back up at the fourth parking lot where I had parked to give an idea of the difficulties at least to old men like me. Maybe not so much to younger and much fitter people with a far better sense of balance than I currently have.

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After having safely making my way down, I took the lower trail which actually takes you along on the river bed. At this time of the year, the water level is low but it is still a bit muddy in some places. I came to a large rock that did not have a way around without getting wet feet that I could see so I scrambled back up the bank until I hit the middle trail and made my way along it towards the fourth parking lot where I had parked my car all the while looking for the Osprey.

I finally came to the trail leading up to the exit and as I climbed, I took the pictures shown above. As soon as I got back to my car, I changed out of my wet clothes into something more comfortable and was sitting and enjoying a piece of fruit when I heard voices and the clink of metal which I guessed to be from the occupants of the other car in the lot. Sure enough, two guys appeared followed by a young lady bringing up the rear all carrying their climbing gear.  The clink of metal was from the pitons that the guys carried on their climbing belts. We exchanged pleasantries as I continued to pack up my gear.

What to me seemed very odd was that the young lady was dressed only in the skimpiest of bikinis. The rock face is some distance from the river so I did not think she had been swimming and there was not enough sunlight under the trees for her to work on her tan. As usual, it was difficult not look at her as she and the two guys horse played around a bit. I wanted to ask her if she had been climbing wearing only a bikini but didn’t have the nerve and was left wondering. Seems to me that the rock face could be awful painful on her body and although regular clothing is not very protective, it at least help prevent the scrapes and cuts. This turned out to be the mystery of the day that is along with the non appearance of the Osprey.

I jumped into my car, taking one last look at things I can only dream about and drove off. I pulled into the second parking lot where I had noticed some yellow flowers that were covered with butterflies and bees and took some pictures.

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I made my way home after having covered a couple of miles on this hike. As I was there for the purpose of getting more pictures of the Osprey, I was perfectly content with the small hiking numbers. After all, it doesn’t always have to be about the walking and the fitness. Most of the time it’s about the pictures and the opportunity to take them.

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These are all panoramic shots made up of several pictures.

Written 10/28/2017

Still Looking for the Osprey – 10-21-2017


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I think that from here on out, every time I take a hike at Reamers Ranch County Park, I will be looking for the Osprey that I was so fortunate to see just a couple of weeks ago. This was true of my last hike on Saturday, October 21st when I broke another one of my unwritten rules and went hiking on a Saturday. As it is late in the season, most of the people were families and kids at the swimming end of the park in the Pedernales River.

I parked in the second parking area that has a long concrete road that leads down to the river that can be used to get small boats into the water. There is no parking at the river itself  so those that drive down have to then bring the vehicles back to the lot and walk back down the hill and do it all again to get the boats back. Maybe that accounts for the reason that I don’t think I have ever seen a canoe or kayak or any type of boat on the river from the park side. The lucky landowners on the far side of the river have canoes and kayaks parked close by the water (but above the flood line) and again, I have still yet to see any of those boats actually in the water. DSC_1245-Pano

But I digress. I readied myself to go walking which takes me a good 15 minutes as I change my socks and boots, strap on my waist camera belt for the long lense camera and also the bino’s, put on the Cotton Carrier harness for my second camera and finally, slip on my backpack with essential supplies like tools to tighten the Cotton Carrier locking units, spare camera batteries, flashlight and spare batteries, a small first aid kit and waterproof gear. If I am out for a long hike, I will not only have two water bottles but also fruit for that extra energy when I need it.

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I walked down the concrete road towards the river and got on the river trail heading upriver to the area that I had previously seen the Osprey. Being a weekend, there were several other hikers using the trail and we exchanged cordial “hellos” and “great day for a hike” and such comments as we passed each other. I walked on taking pictures of the trails and the views across the river and always on the lookout for the Osprey. As usual, there were lots of buzzards taking full advantage of the wind currents as they wheeled and plunged across the sky with the occasional flap of the wings to find the next spiral of air but none of them were the bird I was looking for. This is where the bino’s come in so handy as I can see the birds up close and personal to tell the difference.

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I continued along the river trail for a bit before deciding to do an about turn and make my way back the way I had come. I don’t usually do this but I wanted to walk to the “Beach” area to see the people who were making use of it and maybe get a few pictures. It turns out that there were a couple of families in the water enjoying themselves with the kids making lots of noise as they splashed around. I did not turn the bend to see the rest of the beach area content with the view that I had.

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I made my way back up the concrete road to the Parking Lot passing more people on their way down. The lot had filled up quite considerably from when I arrived and was a mix of people on their way down to the river and those that had just came back from it. Families with young kids were mixed with adults of all ages several of whom were beautiful young ladies in bikinis who again, just like the previous time that I wrote about were so full of confidence and seemed totally unconcerned for their almost nakedness in front of a lot of people. With the few sneak peeks that I got in, I could understand their confidence as to how beautiful they looked but at the same time, the prude in me worried about how this behaviour is now the accepted norm. Not for me to worry much about as I should be grateful that these young women provided me a recollection of how life used to be many years ago when the female body was not a stranger. The passing of the years may play havoc with the body and desires but luckily the eyesight is still good.

I jumped into my car after taking off all of my gear and changing my clothes. I always end up totally soaked after any of these exertions and always carry a spare change of clothes knowing that I most certainly will need them. I made the drive back and detoured into Dripping Springs just to stop at Starbucks to enjoy on the way home.

The question arises, “Do the beautiful girls make up for not seeing the Osprey” and the answer is “Unfortunately, no”. Damn it, I must be getting old…

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Ran into this fine looking fellow and he stood still long enough to take his picture.

Written 10/27/2017

Looking for the Osprey.


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After seeing the Osprey the last time I was at Reimers Ranch, I went back again on October 13 just in case it may still be around. I didn’t intend to hike or travel very far in my search as I knew that I could see the river at about the same spot as I saw the bird before from the Upper Trail that extends the full length of the Park on the bank overlooking the Pedernales.

Unfortunately, there was no sign of anything that even closely resembled that beautiful bird as long as you don’t count the Buzzards and there were plenty of them floating around in the skies above the river. I hung around for a while but the eagle never showed up. I took the panoramic picture above from six individual shots and then worked on them in Lightroom.

So, even though the Osprey never showed, the day was not entirely wasted.

Written 10/25/2017

I Finally Crossed the River.


Pedernales Falls State Park 2-11-2016.

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Trammell’s Crossing, Pedernales Falls State Park.

I stopped into the office to pay my $3.00 and as I do nowadays, asked the usual question of, “Has anyone handed in any sun glasses”. The young Ranger behind the desk came back with 8-10 pairs and my heart leaped as I thought I saw mine among them but no, mistaken identity and again, mine were not there.  The only way mine will show up is if the people that gave me a ride that night would bring them back to this park and it doesn’t look like that is going to happen.

I had already made up my mind after the last hike at Pedernales Falls State Park that I was going to wade the river and hike the Trammell’s Crossing Trail. The only way to get to the other side of the river is to get your feet wet or drive and as private vehicles are not allowed to drive across, it looks like it’s the get the feet wet routine. Trammell’s Crossing is a single slab of granite that spans the river in this particular spot. It is wide enough that the Park Personnel use it to ford the river when they need to drive their vehicles to the other side. It is quite possible to walk across and although the water is about mid calf, enough to get wet feet and socks, very easily wadeable. The only concern is the flow of the water which is quite strong. I found the best and easiest way is very slow steps almost like an ice skater sliding the foot across the tops of the rocks. This keeps the water pressure on the leg down to a minimum.

I tried to cross in a couple of other places a little further upstream but could not find enough rocks to step on and had to turn back both times. I noticed another hiker crossing at the real Trammell’s Crossing and made my way down the trail towards her. She was drying off her feet when I got to her and we stopped and chatted for a while. She sounded like she was a very experienced hiker and mentioned a couple of places I should try. She told me that she had come in from Waco and was camping at the park.

Immediately on crossing the river, my first thought was to stop and dry off my feet and change socks. Then I realized that my leather boots which were also soaked would quickly make the fresh pair of socks wet so I opted to keep walking. It actually was not a bit uncomfortable and did help keep my feet cooler.

The first part of the trails is on a badly decomposing asphalt hill which is pretty steep until it begins to level out near the top. From that point on, the trails were a mixture of grass, rocks and plain old dirt and like all trails had both ups and downs. All of the trails on this side of the river are wide enough for the Park vehicles and made for easy walking. I opted to cover the whole set of trails and to do this, I had to hike figure of eights covering the middle trail twice each time. Using this method, I covered all of the marked trails on this hike.

At the northernmost end, there is a short trail that leads to the Scenic Overlook Trail. Although the view was spectacular, it did not show much more than the other side of the valley along with the thousands of Juniper trees. You could not even see the river from there. I rested for a while before heading back. On the way back, I followed a little used trail which opened up to a view of the river. Quite spectacular.

In one place, there is  the remains of an old stone wall and I can’t help thinking of the hours of hard physical labor that went into gathering the rocks and then stacking them into a wall. At another place on the 5.5 Mile Loop Spur Trail, there are remnants of an old corral, I guess used to hold the steers and cows after they were rounded up.

Back on the main trail, I followed down the 5.5 Mile Loop Spur Trail and by hiking the short dividing trail for a second time, I was able to get back to Trammell’s Crossing where I cooled off my feet one more time as I crossed the river. The climb up the wide trail back to the car was again pretty steep or maybe at that point, the old body was getting tired. I made it back and spent some time drying off and this time had a dry pair of socks and shoes to change into. it was already 5:20 pm and I had been out hiking since 12:30 pm, almost 5 hours of walking. I covered about 11.5 miles by my pedometer which got me thinking. According to the map, this trail is 5.5 miles long so somehow, I managed to double its length. I can account for some with covering two trails twice (on purpose this time) which according to the map, adds up to almost 1 additional mile and then walking down to the crossing from where the car was parked has got to be almost 3/4 of a mile so add on another 1 1/2 miles but the sum total is still only 8 miles and somehow, I added an additional 3 miles to that.

My walking distance is based on a 29 inch step so if another taller person took say a 33 inch step, based on the pedometers readings, would cover more distance than me over the same number of steps. No wonder I am always bringing up the rear on every hike I take with my friends. I could take this a bit further and say that because I take more steps, I walk further than my friends do. Probably though,  if we all had our own pedometers as I do, then the end mileage should be the same although the number of steps would be different.

There are not many trails left for me to cover at Pedernales Falls. I can take a look at the Twin Falls Nature trail and Warfie’s Trail and that just about wraps it up.

If you click on any picture, it will make each one full size. Use the side arrows to move them. Hit the “Escape” key to get back.